“FOR LOVE”

‘For Love’ exposes the link between residential schools and the 29,000 Indigenous children and youth in Canada’s child welfare system.

“The horrors of residential schools are finally starting to be understood by non-Indigenous Canadians and Americans,” says producer Mary Teegee. “I wanted this movie to create awareness about the generational trauma caused by residential schools. But it also celebrates the resilience of our people, and shows how communities across the country are rebuilding family connections and rich cultures.”

150,000 children attended residential schools until the last one closed in 1997. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has condemned them as ‘cultural genocide.’ Indigenous youth are seven times more likely to commit suicide than other young Canadians.

FOR LOVE is a film of resilience and resurgence. Colonization has led to many adverse impacts on the Indigenous population of Canada – most significantly on familial and societal structures. Due to colonial regimes, Indigenous children are vastly overrepresented in the child welfare system. In 2018, the Minister of Indigenous Affairs deemed the issue “a humanitarian crisis.”

Travelling across the country, Indigenous people tell their heartbreaking stories to reveal the atrocities inflicted by the Canadian child welfare system. The film shines a light on what is happening right now. It details the horrors of the past and reveals how Indigenous communities are taking back jurisdictional control of their children in order to ensure that their unique and diverse cultures are preserved for generations to come.

Awakening a revived respect for the matriarchal system, we learn about the need to preserve traditional practices, land-based activities and grass roots initiatives in order to keep having a positive impact on children and families – not only reducing the number of apprehensions, but also renewing Indigenous pride.


“HIGHWAY OF TEARS”

“Highway of Tears” is about the missing or murdered women along a 724 kilometer stretch of highway in northern British Columbia. None of the 18 cold-cases since the 1960’s had been solved, until project E-Pana (a special division of the RCMP) managed to link DNA to Portland drifter, Bobby Jack Fowler with the 1974 murder of 16 year-old hitchhiker, Colleen MacMillen.

“WHY HAVEN’T THE KILLERS BEEN FOUND? IS THIS THE WORK OF ONE OR SEVERAL SERIAL KILLERS?”

In Canada, over 600 Aboriginal women have been reported missing or been murdered since the 1960s. Viewers will discover what the effects of generational poverty, residential schools, systemic violence, and high unemployment rates have done to First Nations reserves and how they tie in with the missing and murdered women in the Highway of Tears cases. Aboriginal women are considered abject victims of violence.

Now find out what First Nations leaders are doing to try and swing the pendulum in the other direction.